Tutorial: Knitting Bobbles

Tutorial: Knitting Bobbles
by

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Bobbles are a kind of texture stitch. They are basically a stitch increased by a number of at least 3, then worked in shortrows and reduced to one stitch again. The number of increased stitches and shortrows define how big the bobble will become. In this tutorial I will show a bobble with 5 stitches and 2 shortrows.

There is another stitch which is worked similar to the bobble. The nupp (pronounced with a long u) is also increased like the bobble but there are no shortrows involved. The nupp is reduced to one stitch on the reverse side.

The Bobble

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1. Knit into the stitch where your bobble should be. Leave the stitch you knitted in onto the knitting needle.

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2. Yarn over.

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3. Work 1 knit stitch, 1 yarn over and 1 knit stitch through the same stitch as previously used. Let the stitch slip off the left needle.

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4. Turn your knitting. Slip the first stitch. Knit 4 stitches loosely.

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5. Turn your knitting. Slip the first stitch. Knit 4 stitches together.

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6. Pull the slipped stitch over it. In the picture it’s the 2nd stitch on the right needle (counting form left to right) you pull over the first stitch on the right needle.

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[blue_box] There are some variations on how you can reduce the increased stitches (step 5+6). I like the version shown best, but here is how you can do it alternatively:

A. Turn knitting. Slip 4 stitches as one as if to knit. Knit 1 stitch. Slip the 4 stitches over the knitted stitch. This only works with a number of 3 or 5 stitches, more stitches will be very difficult to slip over.

B. Turn knitting. Knit 5 stitches together. This can be difficult with many stitches, too, if you did not work the back row loosely.

The more stitches you increase to create the bobble the looser you should work the back row. If your yarn keeps slipping and you can’t get the working yarn through the stitches when decreasing, use a crochet hook to pull the yarn through. [/blue_box]

 

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Anne is an embroidery enthusiast living in rural north eastern Germany.

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