Tag: bobbles

Tutorial: knitting bobbles

The first in this mini-series of textured stitches is the bobble. Bobbles are a classic means to create a very defined texture in knitting. They are typically found in patterns that are already textured on their own like cables, ribbing or twisted stitches. Spread on stockinette the bobble makes a popcorn kind of appearance.

There are several ways to make a bobble. Size can be altered through the amount of stitches you use and how many rows you knit the bobble. The standard bobble in the tutorial here uses 5 stitches and 1 row.

Here is how you do a standard bobble over 5 stitches:

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1. Knit into the stitch where your bobble should be. Leave the stitch you knitted in on the knitting needle.

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2. Yarn over.

3. Work 1 knit stitch, 1 yarn over and 1 knit stitch through the same stitch as previously used. Let the stitch slip off the left needle.

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4. Turn your knitting. Slip the first stitch. Knit 4 stitches loosely.

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5. Turn your knitting. Slip the first stitch. Knit 4 stitches together. Pull the slipped stitch over the knitted stitches.

Here is another way to decrease the bobble to one stitch again. Work the bobble from step 1 to 4, then work the decreasing like shown below.

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5. Slip 4 stitches.

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6. Knit the 5th stitch.

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7. Pull the 4 slipped stitches over the knitted stitch.

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Here is a comparison between the 2 ways of decreasing the bobbles and a 3-stitch-bobble. The upper row is a 5-stitc- bobble with the 4 slipped stitches over one knitted decrease, the middle row is a 3-stitch-bobble, the last row is a 5-stitch-bobble with one slipped stitch over a knit-4-together stitch. The upper row is a bit sturdier than the last row of bobbles, but in some patterns the more teardrop shape of the last row bobbles can be a better fit.

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Here are the links to the tutorials in this series

1. Introduction

2. Bobbles

3. Wrapped stitches

4. Nupps

knit-bobbleseries

noppenserie

 

Introduction: bobbles, nupps and wrapped stitches

Texture in knitting is a wonderful thing. You don’t have to be a genius to create texture and there are A LOT of possibilities in knitting to achieve it. One of the most outstanding textural elements are bobbles. For a long time bobbles where regarded as old fashioned – at least here in Germany- but with a wave of textural excitement and experimental spirit the bobbles came back.

For the next days I want to show you how to make bobbles and other texture stitches similiar to the bobble and how versatile these stitches are in knitting.

Here are the links to the tutorials in this series

1. Introduction

2. Bobbles

3. Wrapped stitches

4. Nupps

 knit-bobbleseries

noppenserie

 

Tutorial: Knitting Bobbles

noppen

Bobbles are a kind of texture stitch. They are basically a stitch increased by a number of at least 3, then worked in shortrows and reduced to one stitch again. The number of increased stitches and shortrows define how big the bobble will become. In this tutorial I will show a bobble with 5 stitches and 2 shortrows.

There is another stitch which is worked similar to the bobble. The nupp (pronounced with a long u) is also increased like the bobble but there are no shortrows involved. The nupp is reduced to one stitch on the reverse side.

The Bobble

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1. Knit into the stitch where your bobble should be. Leave the stitch you knitted in onto the knitting needle.

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2. Yarn over.

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3. Work 1 knit stitch, 1 yarn over and 1 knit stitch through the same stitch as previously used. Let the stitch slip off the left needle.

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4. Turn your knitting. Slip the first stitch. Knit 4 stitches loosely.

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5. Turn your knitting. Slip the first stitch. Knit 4 stitches together.

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6. Pull the slipped stitch over it. In the picture it’s the 2nd stitch on the right needle (counting form left to right) you pull over the first stitch on the right needle.

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There are some variations on how you can reduce the increased stitches (step 5+6). I like the version shown best, but here is how you can do it alternatively:

A. Turn knitting. Slip 4 stitches as one as if to knit. Knit 1 stitch. Slip the 4 stitches over the knitted stitch. This only works with a number of 3 or 5 stitches, more stitches will be very difficult to slip over.

B. Turn knitting. Knit 5 stitches together. This can be difficult with many stitches, too, if you did not work the back row loosely.

The more stitches you increase to create the bobble the looser you should work the back row. If your yarn keeps slipping and you can’t get the working yarn through the stitches when decreasing, use a crochet hook to pull the yarn through.

 

Knitting backwards

Knitting backwards or also called frogging is an activity frequently done over here in the last few days. The good thing is every version of my new scarf is getting a little bit better than the previous and the yarn I’m using is tear out resistant! It’s the same yarn I use for my knitting tutorials.Probably you will not have noticed but it’s not only the same yarn I use for most knitting tuts it’s exactly the same yarn.

linden01

So it’s out, I have 2 small balls of yarn I use for EVERY SINGLE tutorial. And you know what? It still doesn’t show. I think that’s a really hard quality test to be frogged 20+ times. The yarn is named Semilla grosso by BC Garn and I used it for the Caroline and Trigonometric scarf. It’s not a bargain but it’s organic 100% wool and I highly recommend it (no I don’t get paid for this :)).

Off to the knitting needles again, bobbles and cables don’t knit themselves!linden02